Where do I belong? part 8

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My birth cousins, on the other hand, have been most welcoming. The two girls both have high IQ’s and one is dyslexic, while cousin Mervyn has all the family inherited medical conditions – asthma, Meniere’s disease and hammer toes, that I also inherited. We cousins all look alike, are lateral thinkers, can (& do) finish each other’s sentences, have similar taste in food & music and we all share in a strong social justice philosophy. This is despite having been brought up in vastly different socio economic environments, and in different States. My daughter and my cousin are both potters who do very similar work and choose colours that mimic each other despite never having met each other one living in NSW and the other in NT.

In summary, I did not ‘fit’ in my adopted family, at school, work, or in social settings. In many ways I had a more privileged life than my half-sisters, but missed out on knowing people who look and think as I do. Although I now have regular contact with my cousins I have trouble relating to their lives since I don’t ‘know’ the people. The ultimate rejection though was that handed to me by the Western Australian Public Trustee.

 

My birth cousins, on the other hand, have been most welcoming.