Where do I belong? part 2

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Whenever we cousins from either side of the family got together however, I was always singled out. In most of the ‘cousin fights’ I was told I wasn’t one of them. If I had done something good or had bounty to share, I was accepted and included. If however, someone else had something to share I was told I didn’t belong and couldn’t share in the glory, the latter scenario being the more common! I never seemed to ‘fit’ in either family. At school, too I didn’t ‘fit’. Despite having a fairly high IQ I am dyslexic, didn’t manage exams well, couldn’t spell and was good at boys(rather than girls’) sports.

When I was 12 my parents separated, my Mother leaving my Father, and I had to make a decision with which I would live.

In 1950 – divorce was very unusual, and Mothers almost never left Fathers. There was no supporting parent benefit, no child endowment. It was a very nasty divorce, my parents using me to hurt each other. I remember being interviewed by the Judge in his rooms at the Children’s Court, he behind his desk and me in a huge easy chair. I told him I didn’t want to live with either of my parents, I’d rather be sent to Methodist Ladies College as a boarder, or live with my Grandparents.

 

Whenever we cousins from either side of the family got together however, I was always singled out.