THE TAKING OF THE BABY.

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SYSTEMATIC CONTROL BY A CO-ORDINATED TEAM IN RESPONSE TO THE B F A OR UB-ve WRITTEN ON THE FILE

These people had a deliberate plan to prevent the young woman ‘bonding’ to their baby. I know that this sentence sounds ridiculous and has been thought up by men, but these are nearly all women who are going to take the following three roles.
The delusional belief is that it is ‘easier’ for the woman if she doesn’t ‘bond’ to the baby. Much of this twaddle came out of research about ungulate animals and their calves. Research into primates was contradicting these notions. But there were many other rationalisations to mitigate their consciences.

Underneath it all, The Federal Act of 1965 to protect the mothers and babies from financial exploitation gave to religious organisations the responsibility to control most of it. Nobody was policing it.

The opportunity to halt the social changes developing in new directions after the Second World War was dropped in their lap. Most were not even going to read The Act, They knew what was best for society.

Hidden even from the sufferers the chlamydia epidemic had started in the sixties. Effective contraception was available. There were new cultural influences particularly lyrics and major musicals. The sixties has been dubbed a time of sexual revolution. It added to the pressure to adopt from those who could not have their own children because of salpingitis.

The three roles of the team were:

THE CONTROLLER AT THE MOTHERS HEAD
THE ACCOUCHER
THE ‘WICKET KEEPER’

The accoucher properly gowned and gloved is delivering the baby. Instead of lifting the baby to the mother and sometimes resting the baby on the mother’s tummy with the cord still attached allowing blood from the placenta to return to the baby, she immediately puts two clamps on the cord and cuts it, then passes the baby with the clamp and cord to the ‘wicket keeper’ who wraps the baby as she turns and walks out of the room with him. The baby may or may not have cried before this takes place.

While this is all being done, ‘the controller’ is speaking firmly to the mother, keeping her lying down, obstructing her vision, and ready for the mother who will jump up to see her baby and in this crisis behave unpredictably.
This latter part of the baby taking would happen in rapid succession.

In those days, use of ergometrine sometimes left the placenta retained. Delivery of the placenta, even when properly separated, would usually done by pushing the contracted uterus downward and backwoods to push the placenta from the vagina. This is often totally unexpected and unexplained to a first mother in these circumstances. Sometimes the placenta would have to be removed manually under a general anaesthetic

 

Dr Geoff Rickarby Consultant Psychiatrist
November 2014