Spoils of War part 1

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After World War 2 many soldiers had returned home with more than the glory of victory. Venereal diseases, such as Chlamydia, had been passed onto their women making them infertile. And at this time the government realised Australia needed population growth so sterility clinics were attached to maternity hospitals - with little said of the men’s role in this surge of infertility. No doubt that with infertility there were other factors that came into play, such as the detrimental preservatives in processed foods becoming popular at that time. However venereal diseases were becoming a prominent and embarrassing social issue and the Churches were happy to assist government in promoting monogamy and marriage.


When it came to childless soldier families, society was very generous. Whatever the cause of the demand for adoption, surely these returning warriors, more worthy than most, were entitled to the blessing of healthy children? Enter Melbourne’s wealthy Middle Park doctor with an interest in pregnant women. Distinguished by broad face, balding head, double-breasted suit, conservative tie and a taste for elegant living, could the good doctor discreetly help a girl in trouble! Or an older woman! You bet. And many an impotent soldiers’ wife was rewarded with a new baby.

 

After World War 2 many soldiers had returned home with more than the glory of victory.