Discovery part 2

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At around the age of 40, in the 1990’s, I visited my adopting couple where they had retired in Gippsland, Victoria, and didn’t directly ask as to whether I was a bought baby. In fact, at that time, the thought had not entered my head. ‘Out of the blue’ they provided me with a receipt for ₤3 saying it was for Mum’s medical expenses and that the relatively small account was all that they paid. It was as if to prove their case but, given the other lies I had been fed over the years, I felt that they had paid much more for suspect referrals. In the legal consent document I obtained were dubious signatures and the adoption papers had date anomalies and other inconsistencies. The adoption smelt fishy.


From the court documentation it appears my application was pushed through the Court. A Queen Street lawyer was engaged by the adopting couple to achieve the desired result. The lawyer organised a female friend of the family to be the guardian ad litum and, on the day before the adoption hearing, he penned a statutory declaration confirming me as illegitimate. My older adopted brother’s papers were dated the same day. Just another unopposed adoption. Another person involuntarily moved into a dysfunctional household. It took me 60 years to forgive Mum for abandoning me. Now, with a better understanding of the pressures of the time, my attention turns to the structures and organisations that still place the interests of adopting couples before those of the infant and the natural parents.

 

At around the age of 40, in the 1990’s, I visited my adopting couple where they had retired in Gippsland, Victoria, and didn’t directly ask as to whether I was a bought baby.